Bailey Greene ’21

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Bailey Greene ’21

Bailey Greene ’21

Mechanical Engineering
Fort Hood, TX

Bailey knew early on that he wanted to work in the alternative energy automotive industry. He decided the best way to get a foot in the door and affect change towards alternative energy vehicles was to become a mechanical engineer, so he chose to study mechanical engineering. During a campus tour at UTSA, he fell in love with the community and just knew he was meant to be a Roadrunner.

What makes UTSA and its engineering program great?

I love the sense of identity and community we have in the College of Engineering (COE). I appreciate all the amazing resources and programs COE offers. It’s incredible what a solid support network and reasonable expectations can do for your studies and your mental health. UTSA is a welcoming university with a rich campus life experience. As a pansexual, I have never felt unwelcome at UTSA. I feel safe and comfortable being unapologetically me. I hope every Roadrunner feels safe being who they are here and in our community. I want to do my part to make UTSA even more welcoming and inclusive so that now and forever, we remain Roadrunners.

Tell us about COE’s Freshman Interest Group (FIG) Program and what it’s like to be a Peer Advisor!

FIG helps first-year engineering students form connections in their community and create a lasting support network that will help them succeed. I was a FIG student my first year, and I still stay in touch with friends from my cohort. It’s really rewarding to be a Peer Advisor now.

What things are you involved in at UTSA?

I found myself getting really involved in the Student Government Association (SGA), where I currently serve as Speaker of the Senate. I also started a student group called the Council on Diversity and Inclusion (CODI) to help minority groups, like the LGBTQ+ community, feel represented within the COE.

Do you have any advice for Future Roadrunners?

Get involved! This has helped me when I am struggling in my classes. I don’t get overwhelmed or burnt out, because I know I can receive support from the communities I’m involved in.