Dual Credit Program

Dual Credit Program


The UTSA Early Birds Dual Credit Program allows eligible juniors and seniors from high schools across San Antonio to earn college credits while still in high school. All Dual Credit coursework will count as high school as well as college credit. Early Bird students will attend classes on UTSA campuses, earning credits in highly transferable, core curriculum courses. Every participating student will the opportunity to experience everything a top tier four year university has to offer.

Directed by the Institute for P-20 Initiatives, this program works in collaboration with K-12 districts and internal UTSA partners to ensure the success of each and every participating student. The Early Birds Dual Credit Program implements an innovative model, centered around three primary focuses: student experience, rigor, and college readiness. Our goal is to not only provide the highest quality dual credit courses and experiences for our students but to also ensure they go on to successfully apply, attend, and graduate college with their degrees.

Program Eligibility

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for UTSA Early Birds, you must:

  • Be 16 years of age or older
  • Be in good academic standing with your current high school
  • Be college admissible in the subject matter of dual credit course(s) through TSI completion
  • OR be college admissible in the subject matter of dual credit course(s) through exemption by SAT or ACT test scores

Tuition and Fees

  • One time $60 application fee per student (must apply on ApplyTexas)
  • $376 tuition fee per student, per 3-hour course(includes base tuition, textbook, and all other applicable fees)

Course Availability

Course Descriptions

The following courses are available for students to take Spring of 2018. Classes are held at UTSA (Downtown and Main) and taught by internal UTSA faculty.

This course provides an introduction to American politics. The course centers on the fundamental role played by the institutions of American government including Congress, the Presidency, Federal Judiciary, and the Bureaucracy in understanding political dynamics in the United States. The course also examines public opinion and participation as inputs to the institutions of American government, and the mediating role of organizations such as interest groups, the news media, and political parties. Considerable time is devoted to thinking about how these components fit together, and how they shape the nature and importance of citizenship and civic engagement. The course also makes connections between politics at the federal level of government and the political institutions and processes of the state of Texas.
A nontechnical introduction to economic concepts such as scarcity, costs and benefits, supply and demand, trade, employment, and growth, with applications to current economic issues and policies. May not be counted toward a major in economics, but may be counted as a free elective for College of Business students. May be applied toward the core curriculum requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences.
From a variety of perspectives, this course will analyze topics covering the geography of North America; pre-Columbian societies; European colonial societies and their transition into the national period; the development of modern economic structures and political traditions; westward expansion; class, race, ethnicity, and gender; cultural diversity and national unity; the relations of the United States to other nations and cultures; and the impact of these trends and issues on the development of the nation. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in American History.
From a variety of perspectives, this course will analyze topics covering the development of the United States as an urban industrial nation; the rising importance of the business cycle, corporations, and immigration; political traditions; class, race, ethnicity, and gender; cultural diversity and national unity; the relationship between the United States and other nations and cultures; and the impact of these trends on the development of the nation. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in American History.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on TSI Math assessment. This course is designed to prepare the student for MAT 1093 Precalculus and MAT 1214 Calculus I. Topics may include algebraic expressions; equations; inequalities over the real numbers; relations; functions; polynomial and rational functions; logarithmic and exponential functions; systems of linear equations and inequalities; matrices and determinants; complex numbers; sequences; series binomial expansion; mathematical induction; permutations, and combinations.

HS Course Alignment

UTSA Course High School Equivalent
Introduction to American Politics: POL 1013 US Government
US History, Columbus to Civil War Era: HIS 1043 US History Studies to 1877 and/or Special Topics in Social Studies
US History, Civil War Era to Present: HIS 1053 US History Studies since 1877
Algebra for Scientists and Engineers: MAT 1073 Independent Study in Mathematics
Economic Principles and Issues: ECO 2003 Economics

TSI Requirements

Subject Score College Course Level
Math 320-324 MAT 0203 (not college ready)
325-339 MAT 0213 (not college ready)
340-349 MAT 0213 or NCB Option (not college ready)
350-390 Entry College Level Math Course
Reading 310-335 WRC 0203 (not college ready)
336-350 WRC 0203 or NCB Option (not college ready)
351-390 Entry College Level Reading Course
Writing 310-335 WRC 0203 (not college ready)
336-362 WRC 0203 or NCB Option (not college ready)
363-390 Entry College Level Writing Course

Contact Us

Program Contact

Jillian Woolard, Program Manager
Institute for P-20 Initiatives
The University of Texas at San Antonio
Jillian.Woolard@utsa.edu
210-458-2767

Dr. Abel Gonzales, Director
abel.gonzales@utsa.edu
210-458-2763